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Linux Install


Bailey
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Ubuntu is my preferred distro for desktop computers. It's based on the Debian distro, but designed to be more up-to-date with some of the cutting edge versions. Ubuntu believes in open-source and doesn't like closed-source propitiatory software with licensing fees. Pros: It's really easy to install and use and it's not too different from windows/mac. Cons: Security is pretty lax since it's intended for a single user home pc instead of a multi-user server pc. For instance all new users are automatically added to wheel so they can escalate their permissions to root using their own password. They don't even need to know the root password.

 

Xubuntu is just a light version of Ubuntu designed to use less memory and less cpu on older computers. Some people use it on fast, new computers too just because they want maximum performance. Pros: High performance with a lot of the ease of use of full Ubuntu. Cons: Not as pretty and flashy as Ubuntu.

 

Mint is actually based on Ubuntu too, but they allow closed source proprietary software. They also use a different default user interfaces. Ubuntu uses unity which I really like, and Mint has several choices to pick from. Pros: Compatible with Ubuntu and all Ubuntu applications. Cons: You might have to pay for some software.

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Okay thank you! I've chosen Ubuntu. I'm currently trying to duel boot it first off to see whether I actually like it or if it even works.

 

Do you have any tips: Security, good applications? What extension (Windows .exe) etc does Linux use and is it highly compatible with web software. Such as GitHub or other things like Python?

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I just do git on the commandline. To install it just do

sudo apt install git
Then to clone a repo do

git clone https://github.com/<user>/<repo>
Linux doesn't use extensions really. They are there, but they are mostly just cosmetic. Like for a bash script you can name it readme.txt or virus.exe. It doesn't really matter. What matters is the first line that is called the shebang, and the permissions. Generally a readme.txt file would be 644. An executable would be 755.

 

As far as applications go I dislike firefox, so I install google chrome. I use thunderbird for an email client. I don't know. It just depends on what you're trying to do.

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I'm not sure about the stock Ubuntu experience but I can recommend using these ubuntu-based ones over that.

 

Ubuntu MATE: Which is more like Windows, quite easy to use. Quite good.

 

Pop!_OS: Made by a open hardware company, quite good too.

 

http://pop.system76.com/docs/difference-between-pop-ubuntu/

 

Also a shout-out to Solus (Linux): non-ubuntu-based, Developer focused, rolling release so more advanced than Ubuntu-based.

 

Windows will break eventually, don't worry.

 

Enjoy Linux. It will help if your learn basic shell commands.

 

And a early welcome to the init system wars.

 

After you got your OS running type:

 

sudo apt install fish git curl

curl -L https://get.oh-my.fish | fish

 

If you ever need bash, just type: "bash"

 

Feel free to use the water closet in discord too.

 

 

To install Google chrome:

 

sudo apt-get install libxss1 libappindicator1 libindicator7

wget https://dl.google.com/linux/direct/google-chrome-stable_current_amd64.deb

sudo dpkg -i google-chrome*.deb

sudo apt-get install -f

 

 

Also: just stay away from Mint. It's a security minefield. Ubuntu includes proprietary software by Default (see the FSF.)

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Do you have any tips: Security, good applications? What extension (Windows .exe) etc does Linux use and is it highly compatible with web software. Such as GitHub or other things like Python?

Hi Bailey,

In addition to Krydos's post, I suggest you to download apps in a deb file. This format can be installed with one click! (Note: Some apps doesn't provide deb binaries, but only tar.gz sources that you have to extract and install from command line).

Also, if you want to run Windows .exe softwares you can download Wine, a Windows "emulator" for Linux. Website: https://www.winehq.org (This program has a deb version, under the download "Debian")

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Well, looks like I'm in for the ride whether I like it or not because I just corrupted Windows lol.

Doesn't everyone break their first install tho?

 

I recommend wipe the drive and install Ubuntu MATE. https://ubuntu-mate.org

 

Obviously backup your data. It WILL be lost.

 

Do you have any tips: Security, good applications? What extension (Windows .exe) etc does Linux use and is it highly compatible with web software. Such as GitHub or other things like Python?

Hi Bailey,

In addition to Krydos's post, I suggest you to download apps in a deb file. This format can be installed with one click!

This is the worst advice. DO NOT download or install .deb's. it's rarely/never needed. Chrome is a exception, not a rule.

 

As for .tar.gz is considered: look into https://wiki.debian.org/CheckInstall

 

And a good text editor: https://www.sublimetext.com/docs/3/linux_repositories.html

 

@Bailey python (2) is installed by default, it is required by some system software (Which-is-supposed-to-be-C-but-lets-not-get-into-it-now)

 

Python 3 is also included.. I think.

 

 

And a early welcome to the init system wars.

systemctl is superior to init.d and everyone knows it.
Technically it is systemd and SysV if we go by the package names.

 

And to be fair, I think most users are good with systemd but the opposition have good points too for SysV/others.

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Do you have any tips: Security, good applications? What extension (Windows .exe) etc does Linux use and is it highly compatible with web software. Such as GitHub or other things like Python?

Hi Bailey,

In addition to Krydos's post, I suggest you to download apps in a deb file. This format can be installed with one click!

This is the worst advice. DO NOT download or install .deb's. it's rarely/never needed. Chrome is a exception, not a rule.

I didn't know this... Could me explain why?

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I didn't know this... Could me explain why?

manually installed deb's are not managed by the package manager, and it is not updated by the package manager. This is a security risk if nothing else.

 

Most packages are available from the package manager.

 

Some .deb's can break your system.

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This is the worst advice. DO NOT download or install .deb's. it's rarely/never needed. Chrome is a exception, not a rule.

 

I agree, for one, there is no cryptographic verification going on when you download deb files, and also, handling dependencies is very time consuming.

APT does both these things automatically.

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Well, looks like I'm in for the ride whether I like it or not because I just corrupted Windows lol.

 

If you decide to give it another try, perhaps it's best to experiment first with a virtual machine.

Virtualbox (https://www.virtualbox.org/) is pretty easy to use, and it's lets you start over/restore a savepoint if you messed something.

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