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Anyone used Grav?

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#1 badrihippo

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 11:46 AM

Has anyone tried hosting a Grav site on HelioHost? I'm wondering what the performance/resource usage is like.

 

Right now (or rather, when Tommy is back up) I'm using Wordpress, but that seems to be pretty resource-hungry (as people never fail to point out). What I need is a lightweight CMS that still supports plugins, multiple authors, and non-technical interfaces for them to work with. If Grav is light enough, it would probably fit the bill :rolleyes:



#2 sohamb03

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Posted 20 August 2019 - 02:09 PM

If you need uptime and fast loading time, don't go for Grav as well. It's similar to WordPress. I've used Grav previously and quit it eventually due to high downtime. I would suggest you using Joomla if you need a good CMS with better performance. However, it's always good if you can code things yourself (ie, use HTML/CSS).

Having said this, I would also like to mention that I'm on Johnny. Maybe Tommy can handle Grav better. Who knows? You may give it a shot.

Sayan Bhattacharyya


#3 Bailey

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Posted 21 August 2019 - 05:33 PM

There's always the option to use something like Hugo (gohugo.io) or Jekyll (jekyllrb.com) that allow you to code your website while offering lots of useful functions such as being able to easily import plugins etc. It then allows you to build your website via a command an outputs a folder full of CSS/JS/HTML which you can then upload. This also means it loads quicker and there is way less load on your account. 


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#4 badrihippo

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Posted 23 August 2019 - 05:59 AM

Maybe I should be more specific. I don't mind coding, but the website is going to have other collaborators who are not necessarily tech-minded. So I'll need some kind of interface to create/edit/manage posts and pages, and possibly handle things like "scheduling" articles.

 

I would suggest you using Joomla if you need a good CMS with better performance. However, it's always good if you can code things yourself (ie, use HTML/CSS).

 

I'll give Joomla a look—I don't know why, but for some reason I've never got round to trying it out :P

 

There's always the option to use something like Hugo (gohugo.io) or Jekyll (jekyllrb.com) that allow you to code your website while offering lots of useful functions such as being able to easily import plugins etc. It then allows you to build your website via a command an outputs a folder full of CSS/JS/HTML which you can then upload. This also means it loads quicker and there is way less load on your account. 

 

Won't work now, but thanks anyway. They could come in useful in the future. (There's also Pelican which is interesting because it's in Python).



#5 jbbdude

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Posted 27 August 2019 - 11:19 PM

I've been having performance issues with Joomla on Ricky (understandable given its state) so I thought I'd experiment with Grav, as well as other static CMSes like WonderCMS. Unfortunately, it seems Ricky's PHP isn't working at the moment.

 

Jekyll requires Ruby, so it won't work on Ricky.



#6 jenovaon

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Posted 28 August 2019 - 01:29 AM

I've been having performance issues with Joomla on Ricky (understandable given its state) so I thought I'd experiment with Grav, as well as other static CMSes like WonderCMS. Unfortunately, it seems Ricky's PHP isn't working at the moment.

 

Jekyll requires Ruby, so it won't work on Ricky.

 

Ricky doesn't have Ruby? What are RubyGems then?


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#7 sohamb03

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Posted 28 August 2019 - 10:24 AM

@jenova: Rubygems is sort of the hosting manager for the programming language Ruby. It allows you to publish your website coded in Ruby.

Sayan Bhattacharyya


#8 jbbdude

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Posted 28 August 2019 - 12:39 PM

Evidently I was mistaken...



#9 badrihippo

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Posted 01 September 2019 - 08:31 AM

Jekyll requires Ruby, so it won't work on Ricky.

 

What if you generate the site on your own (local) system, then just upload the generated files via FTP? Then you won't have to run anything on the server at all



#10 wolstech

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Posted 02 September 2019 - 01:48 AM

All of our servers have Ruby. It's Rails that you're probably thinking of. We no longer support Rails.

 

I don't know whether Jekyll would run on Ricky, but badrihippo's idea of designing and generating the site on your PC and uploading the resulting files would work just fine.


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